DNA & Self Healing

What Does DNA Have to Do with Self-healing?

Now, I believe we can make an assumption here, and that is that even within the Western medical community, one would find complete agreement that self-healing, or actual healing, happens because of the information that is stored within our DNA. We heal, our bodies get well, because of instructions that are found within our DNA.

Let’s take a closer look at this. To begin, what is the purpose of DNA? In other words, what has DNA been doing all this time since life began here on Earth? This may seem like a huge question . . . but it’s not that difficult to answer.

From its inception, DNA has had one purpose, one intention, one directive, and that is “survive.” It is only motivated by the continuance of life. Its only job or activity has been providing survival instructions for the body, for the organism, for the cell. It has done a good job, wouldn’t you agree? I’m here; you’re here; we are all here because it did what it was supposed to do.

The question would be, how has this remarkable natural mechanism, or device, or technology, or whatever we want to call it (we are talking about DNA), kept this race of humans and all living creatures alive for these countless millennia?
DNA hands The answer again is quite simple: it kept good notes. It kept a running record of all its successes — how it fixed and replicated itself.

For how long? Most scientists would agree that it’s somewhere around 3.5 billion years. The DNA that’s inside of you, the DNA that’s inside of me, and the DNA that’s inside every living creature on Earth has been around for three and a half billion years, and it has been learning that entire time. It has not been dead and then born and then dead and born again. No, it has been alive for all those endless years of the past.

Another thing is that DNA is always alive when it is passed down through the generations. You got your DNA from your parents (they were alive), and they got their DNA from their parents (again living), on and on and on, all the way back to the first man or woman, animal, or single-cell organism. There has never been a total break in this chain of life. If there was a break in a particular evolutionary line, that organism ceased to exist; its species is extinct. Nature does not tolerate failure.

Information stored in DNA

By now, having been alive since life began here on Earth, our DNA ought to be pretty smart! If we wanted to make an assessment of how much information is stored in just a single microscopic strand of DNA, what would be a good estimate? In computer terms, it would come to about 6 gigabits.

To give you a better comparison, if every single person on this planet represented one piece of information, the entire population of Earth would be stored in a single DNA strand.

How is this information stored? To oversimplify it, we could say that DNA has arranged itself into lines of “code”, or instructions, that are the blueprint of our bodies and their functions.

Now, what do we mean by that? The explanation from a medical text would be that DNA is made up of four different kinds of body chemistry, referred to as “bases,” or “building blocks,” of our DNA. How these are arranged or how they line up and fit together determines DNA code; these are what provide the instructions for our bodies to follow.

But if one looks below that understanding, we find an even smaller breakdown. An underlying code exists, because those bases or building blocks are made of something, basic elements, and those elements stick together because of a little charge — a push or a pull, a plus or a minus. It is this point where we step out of biochemistry and step into the field of physics. It is this crossover point from biochemistry to physics that will give us a new understanding of the functioning of the human body. We must step out of the medical field and into the field of physics, as we need to view the structure and function of a human body at the atomic level.

It makes a major difference whether one views the human form from a chemical, biological, or physics point of view. Biological and chemical systems can seem rather complex, By now, having been alive since life began here on Earth, our DNA ought to be pretty smart! If we wanted to make an assessment of how much information is stored in just a single microscopic strand of DNA, what would be a good estimate? In computer terms, it would come to about 6 gigabits. 11 but looked at from a physics point of view, we see simply a long chain of places where something will either attach or not, stick or code.
DNA hands

DNA handsA binary code is the language (or “memory”) found in your computer. The code is built on two values: a one or zero, an on or off, a plus or minus. Morse code, with its dots and dashes, is a binary code.

Therefore, beneath all the complexity of human biological systems, cluttered with “Latin” labels, lies a simple, simple, simple mechanism. It began with DNA back in a watery ocean: either something bonded or did not bond, stuck or did not stick.
It’s a rather sad comment on our society that we strive to make these subjects so complex, because the truth is that you, me, all our families and friends, everyone on Earth, on a fundamental basis — all bodies — are made of little things that either want to push or pull, attract or repel, and that’s it. No matter how many old professors speak Latin to us, nothing changes that.

On the most primary level, how your body operates is dead simple. Oh, it appears complex; don’t get me wrong! Even if you strip away all the complicated Latin labels, it will still look very complex; but there is a simple answer to why it appears so.

It’s a rather sad comment on our society that we strive to make these subjects so complex, because the truth is that you, me, all our families and friends, everyone on Earth, on a fundamental basis — all bodies — are made of little things that either want to push or pull, attract or repel, and that’s it. No matter how many old professors speak Latin to us, nothing changes that. On the most primary level, how your body operates is dead simple. Oh, it appears complex; don’t get me wrong! Even if you strip away all the complicated Latin labels, it will still look very complex; but there is a simple answer to why it appears so.

DNA hands

Quantity is described in physics as NUMBER. What do we mean by that? At any given moment, there are billions, if not trillions, of simple processes concurrently happening. So it is easy to become overwhelmed by the NUMBER of processes. If you looked out your front door and saw one friend, you would not be shocked or overwhelmed; but if you looked out that same door and saw a trillion friends . . . well, you get the idea.

There are billions, sometimes trillions, of processes happening at the same time. The basic functions at the smallest level are not complicated; it is just a plus or a minus, stick Simple Complex 12 (bond) or no stick (no bond). It only looks complex because of the number of concurrent processes that are occurring.

Once you understand that principle, it is time to take a look at the functioning of a body from a brand-new perspective.

In physics, we know that the smallest elements bond or don’t bond. That is the simplicity of life’s actions also. Remember, you, I, and all life began in a simple fashion in that watery ocean eons ago.
Each step of our evolution was one of replication. Same as today; because when you get sick and your DNA fixes you, it does so by replicating the successful actions of the past. It replicates a pattern or a code present in the soup of the cell, and it picks up those things that are in the cell and, in that sense, it builds or reproduces a new piece of body chemistry — such as a particular protein.

It is a straightforward replication process. This is the code we have been talking about! The body reproduces itself because of places to stick, or bond. It is the simple replication of what is there, what worked in the past.

If one looks at this subject of health in the above light, with a possible new understanding, one can only come to this conclusion: What goes into the body could very well end up sticking to that new replication: the new piece of body chemistry that is supposed to go forward in time might be grossly wrong. Bad replication means you could actually be affecting your genetic code.

DNA hands

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